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Talking of nobility


“Is teaching considered a noble profession in Bhutan?” a poll on BBS website asked the visitors. And the options provided is (1) Yes and (2) No!

Hmmm.
(This is how it goes)

This is a tough one. And before I click an option, I would like to ponder a brief. Really briefly here and cast my vote. 

This makes me ponder a bit. Teaching is, irrespective of geographical boundaries, a noble profession. No doubt about that. But is it in Bhutan? Teaching par se is a noble profession everywhere. Bhutan should not be an exception. Making someone’s children learn is so much exciting and at the same time the most satisfying experience. This is how all teachers feel. Apologies to those teachers who landed up in a wrong work place; many dedicated teachers see their professions in that perspective.

But the recent incident at a private school in Thimphu was seriously a serious blow to the profession in particular and the nation in general.  That unfortunate incident must have made teachers across the country rethink if their “noble” profession has suddenly become less “noble” or ignoble. How can a parent walk into a classroom and beat up the teacher? It sure was a big disgrace. And now you see, teachers are making noise. Not without reasons – they sort of want some degree of punishment to be meted out to students when they cross wrong paths.

However, I sincerely hope that does not give reasons enough to bring back corporal punishment in schools. Again it is funny. Did I say, “to bring back corporal punishment”? This is because in some schools, especially in rural pockets, corporal punishment has not gone out. Not yet. Believe it or not, it is happening. We have enough evidence to prove that. Our authorities may or may not know this. Well, in urban school punishment might be heard less, but back in the village schools, it still exists. And once let’s admit it.

And how is corporal punishment connected with the nobility of the profession? That’s another question for another post.

So, back to the question – is teaching a noble profession in Bhutan? It all depends on which side of the equation we are and for the same reason, my answer unfortunately lies somewhere between “yes” and “no”.  But certainly I would love to teach children. Yes dedication until my lungs dry up. 

P.S: Purely personal opinions and no intentions whatsoever made to judge anyone. Apologies if you misread my intention. 

Comments

  1. I don't like this 'noble' thing attached to my profession, honestly, it just another profession and it's needless to sugarcoat...
    Coming to corporal punishment, i swear I will not use it in anger, I will not use it to have my personal work done... and if you tell me not to use it while teaching then I will quit my job... i personally know when and when not to use, how much to use, why to use, and my students understand why they are getting it...

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